Daily exercise may boost better lung function among smokers

Sakshi Chaturvedi

Sakshi ChaturvediBy Sakshi Chaturvedi

Published on 6 Feb 2018 11:04 AM GMT

Daily exercise may boost better lung function among smokers
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Daily exercise may boost better lung function among smokers
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London: If you are a smoker try doing regular physical activities as it may help you to have better lung function, a new study suggests.

According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers.

"This result highlights the importance of physical activity among current smokers specifically, which are a group at higher risk of poor lung function," said lead author of the study Elaine Fuertes, researcher from the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal).

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"One possible explanation for this result may be that physical activity improves respiratory muscle endurance and strength via a short or moderate term effect that requires sustained physical effort to maintain it," Fuertes added.

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centres in 11 countries.

Over a 10-year period, 3,912 adults (aged between 27 to 57-years-old at the start of the study) were considered as being active if they exercised with a frequency of two or more times a week and a duration of one hour a week or more.

Associations between physical activity and lung function were only apparent among current smokers, suggesting the existence of an inflammation-related biological mechanism, the researchers said.

The researchers also found that participants who were active at the end of the study, either by becoming active or remaining active throughout, had significantly higher lung function than those consistently inactive.

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"The results of this study strengthen the epidemiological evidence supporting an association between physical activity and respiratory health," said co-author Judith Garcia-Aymerich, Head of the Non-Communicable Diseases and Environment Programme at ISGlobal.

"This evidence should be used to inform and support public health messages that promote increasing and maintaining physical activity as a way of preserving respiratory health in middle-age adults," Garcia-Aymerich noted.

IANS

Sakshi Chaturvedi

Sakshi Chaturvedi

A journalist, presently working as a Sub-Editor at newstrack.com.

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