Rise in Air Pollution is Linked To Cardiovascular Disease

With the rise in air pollution, the cognitive development of an individual is affected and it is also related with Cardiovascular disease, say experts.

Shivani Arora

Shivani AroraBy Shivani Arora

Published on 13 July 2020 12:58 PM GMT

Rise in Air Pollution is Linked To Cardiovascular Disease
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Rise in Air Pollution is Linked To Cardiovascular Disease
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With the rise in air pollution, the cognitive development of an individual is affected and it is also related with Cardiovascular disease, say experts. While the ill effects of air pollution are widely known, it is now being considered as a definitive causative factor for cardiovascular disease.

A report in The New York Times quotes a research conducted by 21 countries. In addition, where the researchers examined PM 2.5 particles of soot. During the study, the average level was 47.5 micrograms per cubic meter, markedly higher than the allowed limit of 12.

Study:

The study was followed by 157,436 people within the age group of 35-70 years. In the consequent follow up nine years, the report states, “there were 9,152 fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular events”.

A rise in PM directly led to an increase in the risk of cardiovascular health. The report breaks it down. “Each 10 microgram per cubic meter increase in PM 2.5 was associated with a 5 per cent increase in the risk for any cardiovascular event, a 3 per cent increased risk for heart attack, a 7 per cent increased risk for stroke, and a 3 percent increased risk for cardiovascular death.”

READ ALSO: WHO releases new Guidelines on Airborne transmission of Covid19

Almost 14 per cent of all cardiovascular illness are linked to air pollution and eight percent of cardiovascular deaths.

Published in Lancet Planetary Health, the study took into consideration factors like hypertension, sex, physical activity and other behavioural patterns.

“Air pollution is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease globally. There needs to be improvement, especially in developing countries, and even marginal decreases in air pollution make a big difference,” Perry Hystad lead author of the study and associate professor at Oregon State University was quoted as saying. Hence,the air pollution is linked with Cardiovascular disease.

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Shivani Arora

Shivani Arora

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