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Coronavirus: Boon for endangered animals!

There have been hundreds of deaths due to coronavirus so far. At the same time, the number of people suffering from this virus is increasing in countries around the world.

Yogita S.

Yogita S.By Yogita S.

Published on 5 Feb 2020 10:38 AM GMT

Coronavirus: Boon for endangered animals!
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S.Faizan Musanna

There have been hundreds of deaths due to coronavirus so far. At the same time, the number of people suffering from this virus is increasing in countries around the world.

Scientists believe that the virus originated from a market selling sea creatures in the Chinese city of Wuhan. This market was known for the illegal trade of wild animals such as snakes, raccoons and porcupines.

These animals were kept in cages and used as foodstuffs and medicines.

But since the ban on Khube province, this market has also been banned. China is the largest consumer of wild animals in the world where this trade is legal and illegal.

According to the World Health Organization, bats may be the primary sources of this virus. It is also being said that this virus must have gone into another animal before it came into humans, which has not yet been identified.

Some animals in China are eaten due to their taste. At the same time, some animals are used in traditional medicine.

There are many restaurants in different parts of China where bat soup means bat soup. You get a whole bat in these soup bowls.

Many soups include tiger testicles and palm civet body parts. Dishes such as roasted cobra snakes, roasted bear's claws, wine made from tiger bones can be found expensive restaurants.

Some rare bird species including rats, cats, snakes are also sold in some markets selling animals.

China's wildlife market is also held responsible for bringing many types of birds to extinction. "In China, the idea of 'Yevai' (the word in Chinese translates to wild test) is a term spoken in the house," says an investigator associated with an international organization investigating the animal trade in China. That culturally explains adventure, adventure, investigative nature and privilege in China. "

Regarding the use of traditional Chinese medicine made from animal organs, animal organs are believed to have the ability to cure diseases such as male impotence, arthritis and arthritis.

Extinction risk:

Due to the high demand for the armour of the pangolin animal in China, this animal has become almost extinct in China. Now it has become the most hunted animal in other parts of the world too.

Unicorn horn is highly used in Chinese medicine and due to this practice, the unicorn has also become a threatened animal. All this is happening in China when people know that 70 per cent of new viruses have come from animals, especially wild animals.

The coronavirus has once again exposed the wildly traded trade in China. Wildlife conservation institutions constantly criticize it. Because of this trade, many species of animals have reached the verge of extinction.

After the coronavirus spread, the Chinese government has immediately banned the trade of wildlife in order to prevent the virus from spreading.

But the organizations working for wildlife conservation are trying to use this opportunity to stop this trade completely.

The SARS virus, which hunted more than seven people, also came from a civet cat brought for sale in the Chinese wildlife market.

Will China Listen to Wildlife Conservators?

Will the coronavirus infection bolster global efforts to stop the illegal trade-in wildlife and avoid threats to social health?

According to experts, this is a very challenging task and it seems almost impossible to happen. According to the World Health Organization, the dreaded viruses SARS came from bats. But they also came through civet cats and camels before coming into humans.

Dr Ben Imbarek, who is associated with the World Health Organization's Department of Nutrition and Food Safety, told the media, "We are reaching and in contact with the species of wildlife that we had no connection with before. That has not been seen before in humans. These diseases have not been seen in known viruses, bacteria and parasites as well. "

A recent analysis shows that 20 per cent of the total 32 thousand species of on-the-ground bony animals are being legally and illegally bought and sold in the international market.

This means that the buying and selling of more than 5,500 species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians continue.

The illegal trade of animals in the world is worth 20 billion dollars. And it comes at number four after drugs, human trafficking and counterfeit goods.

Is this a warning bell?

The World Wide Fund for Nature stated in its statement, "This health crisis should be taken as a bell of danger to domesticate the threatened animals and to exploit their organs as food and for their medicinal properties." To be stopped. "

However, the Chinese government has clarified that this ban will remain immediate.

Three joint government organizations in China said in their joint statement, "All species of wildlife are banned, transported and sold from one place to another, from this announcement until the end of the state of the national epidemic."

China imposed a similar ban on the outbreak of the SARS virus in the year 2002, but according to the patrons, the trade of wildlife started raging in China only a few months after the ban.

In the month of September 2020, China is going to organize a global meeting called Biodiversity Conference in which natural and biological resources will be discussed.

According to an inter-governmental report released last year, for the first time in human history, one million species are in danger of extinction.

Editorial articles published in the Chinese state media after the outbreak of the coronavirus has been seen condemning the uncontrolled trade in animals and their organs.

Debbie Banks, associated with the Environmental Investigation Agency, an agency that investigates the trade in animals in China, says, "This is seen as an opportunity to observe, breed, domesticate and flesh animals as well as medicinal properties." To be completely banned for use as well. "

Experts believe that avian influenza and bird flu have helped in the conservation of many wild bird species.

Experts see the ban on ivory imposed in China as a breakthrough due to international pressure to protect elephants from extinction.

According to experts, China is the biggest market for wild animals and their body parts, in such a situation it can lead this mission by implementing such a ban.

But regulation and restrictions on products related to animals need to be imposed globally, not just China.

Yogita S.

Yogita S.

Media Graduate, News Editor and PR Enthusiast.

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