Afghanistan Crisis: Over 257 Media Houses shut down after Taliban Rule

More than 70 percent of Afghan media personnel have been unemployed or left the country since Kabul's accession to the Taliban on August 15.

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Published on 24 Nov 2021 8:20 AM GMT

Afghanistan Crisis: Over 257 Media Houses shut down after Taliban Rule
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New Delhi: What happened after the Taliban's rule over Afghanistan is not hidden from anyone. Moreover, the Taliban have also ruled the media. A media report quoting an NGO said that since the Taliban took over Afghanistan, a total of 257 media outlets have been closed "due to financial challenges and sanctions".

Ban on Media outlets:

NAI, the group that has been advocating for and supporting the Afghan media industry since 2004, said on Tuesday that closed outlets include print, radio and TV stations, Tolo News reported.

More than 70 percent of Afghan media personnel have been unemployed or left the country since Kabul's accession to the Taliban on August 15. Reports also revealed that during the 100 days of Taliban rule, six journalists lost their lives in various incidents including attacks by unknown armed men, explosions, suicides and traffic incidents.

257 media houses closed:

Officials of the Taliban-led Islamic Emirate government have repeatedly said they are committed to protecting the achievements of the media and freedom of expression. But some recent orders issued by the Islamic Emirate for media operations have raised everyone's concern.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) on Monday raised concerns about the Taliban imposing tough new media guidelines in Afghanistan that specifically harm women. HRW said in a statement that Taliban intelligence officials have issued death threats to journalists who have criticized Taliban officials and that journalists are required to submit all reports for approval before publication.

The rights group said that under new guidelines from the Vice and Vertue ministry, women in Afghanistan have been banned from appearing in television dramas. Women journalists and presenters have also been ordered to wear headscarves on screen, although the guidelines do not say what type of cover to use. Reporters say some of the rules are vague and subject to interpretation.

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Yogita

Yogita

She covers current News topics, keeps the audience updated with Buzz around the world.

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