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25 mango varieties are grown in a Lucknow park; DEETS inside

The park's name is Gulab Park, but it is well-known for its mango trees.

Shivani

ShivaniBy Shivani

Published on 13 Jun 2021 1:01 PM GMT

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A Lucknow park grow 25 mango varieties

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LUCKNOW: Everyone, regardless of social standing, enjoys eating mangoes. Mangoes taste even better when they're fresh from your own garden. Growing mango trees in cities like Lucknow is difficult due to the limited amount of land available, which is only for a few fortunate families. To meet the needs of the surrounding community, the hobby can be carried out by utilising land in local parks. The Virat Khand-2 Association has developed such park.

Gulab Park

The park's name is Gulab Park, but it is well-known for its mango trees. The efforts of the resident Association and the Central Institute of Subtropical Horticulture resulted in the park being transformed into a "collection garden" of over 25 different varieties. Not only Arunika and Ambika are doing well, but so are older varieties such as Langra, Dussehri, Amrapali, and Chausa.

Why travel to Malihabad when you can visit Virat Khand Gulab Park and enjoy the many varieties of mangoes that grow on the same tree? Mr. B.K. Singh, the main person behind this endeavour, stated that it is the culmination of a decade-long effort that began with the planting of mango saplings. He contacted the institute in order to obtain traditional varieties of trees with red fruits. Tall seedling trees in the park were top-worked (the art of converting trees to different varieties) with CISH varieties. Arunika, Langra, Amrapali, and many other mango varieties developed on the seedling tree branches. This operation was carried out gradually over the course of 12 years, and at the time of writing, 25 different varieties had been grafted on a good number of trees.

This park has its own draw during the flowering season. Mangoes begin to flower in March, and after a few weeks, red fruits of various varieties are frequently found on the same tree. In just three years, grafted plants began bearing fruits, prompting BK Singh to select varieties such as Ambika and Arunika, which attracted all for tastes better.

Many people come to the park to see the various mango varieties.

Visitors to the park come from all over the city, not just Virat Khand. Seeing dozens of mango plants in one place is a very rare occurrence. Mangoes are harvested before they reach full maturity in the majority of public parks. The rules, he explained, prohibit visitors from plucking the fruits. Those who pluck mangoes while the park is open face a fine of Rs 200.

On Sundays, mango parties are common (this year restricted due to corona). Members of the park join in the picnic, which includes a variety of mango varieties. Members of the park enjoy a variety of mangoes, while Ambika and Arunika fruits are presented to dignitaries. Mango plants have influenced residents' social networks. They eat mangoes and take care of the park together. Mangoes are grown without the use of fertilisers, but the fruit size and quality are excellent due to the regular use of organic manures. Mango plants are free of major pests.

Amrapali, Dussehri, and Chausa are among the varieties that can be found growing in the same orchard. By the end of July, Amrapali with small to medium-sized fruits will be visible. Members of the park prefer CISH-developed varieties such as Ambika and Arunika.

Regular grafting on a tree for a couple of years transformed a mango into a unique multi-variety mango plant. Every year, a request is made to graft more varieties onto the trees. BK Singh wishes to graft a greater number of new varieties onto the trees. Director CISH explained that this is yet another method for conserving rare varieties in city parks. Numerous varieties contribute to a park's collection of 50 or more varieties at various branches of the tree. This technology not only aids conservation, but it also makes carbide and pesticide-free mangoes available to all park-related families.

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Shivani

Shivani

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