Google celebrates microbiologist Hans Christian Gram's 166th birthday

On the eve of Danish microbiologist, Hans Christian Gram’s 166th birth anniversary Google honoured him with a Google doodle. Gram was a bacteriologist and was known was for inventing the Gram stain.

Anshramehdi
Published on: 13 Sep 2019 5:25 AM GMT
Google celebrates microbiologist Hans Christian Grams 166th birthday
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Lucknow: On the eve of Danish microbiologist, Hans Christian Gram’s 166th birth anniversary Google honoured him with a Google doodle. Gram was a bacteriologist and was known was for inventing the Gram stain.

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The doodle, created by Danish guest artist Mikkel Sommer, shows ‘Google’ spelled in letters illustrated as-Gram carrying out his experiments, his round glasses, a microscope and bacteria.

In 1891, Gram taught pharmacology, and later that year was appointed professor at the University of Copenhagen. In 1900, he resigned his chair in pharmacology to become a professor of medicine. Gram was the son of a professor of jurisprudence Frederik Terkel Julius Gram and mom Louise Christiane Roulund. In his early studies, Gram was focused on natural science but after earning a B.A. at the Copenhagen Metropolitan School and working as an assistant in botany at a zoo, he became interested in medicine.

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The Gram technique of identifying bacteria still used today

He is credited with devising a staining technique to identify and classify different types of bacteria. The technique is still used today and has become the first stop for microbiologists identifying bacteria. A Gram stain is made using a primary stain of crystal violet and a counterstain of safranin. Bacteria that turn purple when stained are called 'Gram-positive', while those that turn red when counterstained are called 'Gram-negative'.

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The Danish microbiologist's findings were published in a scholarly journal in 1884 where he wrote: “I have therefore published the method, although I am aware that as yet it is very defective and imperfect; but it is hoped that also in the hands of other investigators it will turn out to be useful.”

Anshramehdi

Anshramehdi

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