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Toughest mission of ISRO, launches 8 satellites from PSLV-C35

Pratham and PISAT, co passengers, of PSLV-C35 have also been launched with the satellites. The co-passengers have been designed by students of IIT Bombay and PES University Bangalore respectively

Arnima Dwivedi

Arnima DwivediBy Arnima Dwivedi

Published on 26 Sep 2016 6:06 AM GMT

Toughest mission of ISRO, launches 8 satellites from PSLV-C35
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Sriharikota: In its longest mission of 2 hours 15 minutes, Indian Space research Organisation ISRO, on Monday, has successfully launched eight satellites on Polar satellite launch vehicle PSLV-C35 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre from Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh that are to be placed into two different orbits.

The PSLV-C35 carries eight satellites including three from India and five from Algeria, Canada and United States out of which one satellite namely SCATSAT-1 has already been placed into first orbit.

Pratham and PISAT, co passengers, of PSLV-C35 have also been launched with the satellites. The co-passengers have been designed by students of IIT Bombay and PES University Bangalore respectively.

According to AS Kiran Kumar, Chairman of ISRO, the major challenge was to place satellite from a single rocket into different orbits.The chairman stated." This is a challenging two-in-one mission which puts India in a unique.

Also Read: Prime Minister Narendra Modi applauds ISRO over INSAT launch

About SCATSAT:

  • SCATSAT is an advanced weather forecasting satellite that would provide information regarding weather fluctuations including Cyclone detection and forecasting.
  • Placed in the polar sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of about 730 kms, it will succeed the now defunct Oceansat-2 satellite launched in 2009.

About Pratham:

  • It is a 10-kg satellite developed by the students of Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay. It will be placed in a sun-synchronous orbit around 670 km above the altitude of the earth.

Arnima Dwivedi

Arnima Dwivedi

A journalist, presently working as a sub-editor with newstrack.com. I love exploring new genres of humans and humanity.

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